Adoptive Breastfeeding and Domperidone

I first wrote this post on April 17, 2010, after I first tried inducing lactation using breast stimulation only, and failed. The post was worth updating with all the research I’ve done and the new experience I gained over the years. 😉

Perhaps you have heard about adoptive breastfeeding.

Perhaps you’re reading about it for the first time on this blog.

“Adoptive breastfeeding” is the close nursing bond between a mother and her adopted child, a bond that donates the mother-child couple a ‘chunk’ of biological parenthood and helps build attachment and a solid sense of belonging in both the mother and the child, aiding the child’s integration within the new family, and a sense of trust in their parents.

I am a spiritual mother. Like an adoptive mother, I had no biological cord to unite me to my children, so this is what I pursue with adoptive breastfeeding. This bond.

And it’s why in induced lactation in the first place, since I have no biological kids of my own.

 

Domperidone boosts prolactin and milk supply

Yes, adoptive breastfeeding is possible

Biologically speaking, our breasts are designed to produce milk regardless of a former pregnancy, which means that it’s sufficient to get a baby to breast to inform the pituitary gland that a baby’s there and needs milk. It can take a couple of weeks to see drops like that, and that is the most natural way to induce lactation.

But when your baby’s not there yet, you can still induce the production of breastmilk if you provide the proper physical stimulation and lactogenic herbs and/or drugs.

A baby to breast or a combination of physical (breast pump, massage) and herbal or medical aid increase the levels of prolactin in our body.

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That’s why our breasts begin producing milk.

How can Domperidone promote lactation?

Domperidone acts as a dopamine antagonist, helping the pituitary gland release the prolactin hormone that triggers the production of milk as well as breast enlargement.

Recommended dosages for inducing lactation vary from a minimum of 80 mg (8 tablets a day) or a maximum of 160 mg (16 tablets).

Start at the lowest recommended dosage (10 mg, 4 times a day) and then increase weekly. You’re going to start seeing the effects on your breast and/or milk production within days or a week.

For the induced lactation protocol I followed (the Newman-Goldfarb protocol) see AskLenore.info, and contact or post in the forums at La Leche League for support and advice.

Where to buy Domperidone?

In Italy, I have bought Peridon in boxes by 30 tablets each behind prescription. That was what I did in 2015.

Since then, I started buying Vesperidone (in cans by 1,000 tablets each), a brand I feel more comfortable with and a lot cheaper than Peridon.

Vesperidone cans that I bought in the late 2017

You can Domperidone  online in several forms and brands:

  • Motilium is available on Big Mountain Drugs starting at $41 for 100 tablets
  • Vomistop (minimum 500 tablets, 10 mg per tablet) can be purchased on In House Pharmacy starting at $70
  • Vesperidone (my fav brand) is available on Suffice here ad here for $30

Of course, you should choose the brand and tablet amount per box or can that suits your needs the best.

** NOTE: please keep in mind that Domperidone can ONLY be taken upon prescription in the USA, and recently even in my country, Italy. Although websites like In House Pharmacy and Suffice do not require a prescription for the order, it’s always a good idea to check with your doctor first.

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Concluding Thoughts

Domperidone can be a life saver for inducing or relactating mothers, and it’s proven to help mothers who struggle with a low milk supply.

It doesn’t cross the brain barrier, so it’s safe to take for both mom and baby.

However, Domperidone is also known to cause issues to people with heart diseases, so if you suffer from even a minor heart problem, consult your doctor before purchasing a non-prescription dose of Domperidone.

Although not all adoptive mothers succeed in achieving a full milk supply despite all the stumulation, drugs and herbs they use, they can still enjoy the beauty of breastfeeding because their children will still get a partial supply AND their mothers’ love.

The bond is at the heart of adoptive breastfeeding, not the milk. <3

Disclaimer: I’m not a doctor. The fact I know a few medical terms thanks to my parents in the medical field doesn’t make me a doctor. I’m only a spiritual mom who has induced lactation, and what you just read is what has worked for me. Always talk to your doctor before making decisions over such delicate health matters.

About Luana

Luana is a spiritual mom in her early thirties. She enjoys blogging and she especially loves to provide fellow Moms (and Dads) with precious advice from her experience as a spiritual mom and from the knowledge that comes from her reading, her nursery school traineeship and her experience as an elder sister who helped raise and educate her younger siblings (twins!).